Anxiety about certain things can be hereditary

We all know our parents have a big impact on our lives, but new evidence is emerging that our parents’ behaviors before we are born may have a bigger influence on us than we previously imagined.

Epigenetic research is a hot-button topic at the moment, generating a lot of attention in both scientific studies and the media. Epigenetics is the ability of genes to be influenced by our experiences, altering our genetic make-up in real time. By changing the chemical signals that course through your brain and body, you can actually turn genes on or off, a process that can then influence your future actions. Thus, in some ways, epigenetics can be thought of as the bridge between nature and nurture—your behavior and environment affecting your biology, and vice versa.

Can synesthesia in autism lead to savantism?

Daniel Tammet has memorized Pi to the 22,514th digit. He speaks ten different languages, including one of his own invention, and he can multiply enormous sums in his head within a matter of seconds. However, he is unable to hold down a standard 9-to-5 job, in part due to his obsessive adherence to ritual, down to the precise times he has his tea every day.

Daniel is a savantHe is also autistic.And he is a synesthete.

Do you have an addictive personality?

You’ll have to bear with me if this is a bit of a self-indulgent post, but I have some exciting news, Brain Study-ers: I’ve officially submitted my dissertation for a PhD in psychology!

In light of this – the culmination of three years of blood, sweat, tears and an exorbitant amount of caffeine – I thought I’d write this week on part of my thesis work (I promise to do my best to keep the jargon out of it!)

One of the biggest questions in addiction research is why do some people become dependent on drugs, while others are able to use in moderation? Certainly some of the risk lies in the addictive potential of the substances themselves, but still the vast majority of individuals who have used drugs never become dependent on them. This then leads to the question, is there really such a thing as an “addictive personality”, and what puts someone at a greater risk for addiction if they do choose to try drugs?

You are what you eat

Anyone who’s ever tried to cure the blues with Ben and Jerry’s knows that there is a link between our stomachs and our moods. Foods high in fat and sugar release pleasure chemicals like dopamine and opioids into our brains in much the same way that drugs do, and I’d certainly argue that french fries and a chocolate milkshake can perk up even the lousiest of days.

This brain-belly connection works in the opposite direction, too. Ever felt nauseous before giving a big presentation? Or had butterflies in your stomach on a first date? It’s this system relating feedback from your brain to your gut causing those sensations and giving you physical signals that something big is about to happen.

An unconventional treatment for depression: Sleep deprivation

I watched a good ‘psychological thriller’ the other night - Side Effects by Steven Soderbergh – that centers on a woman’s debilitating depression and critiques the pharmaceutical industry’s untoward influence over clinicians (it turns into a plot-twisty crime thriller, but that’s beside the point). The film got me thinking about our reliance on psychotropic medications to treat psychological distress, and how helpless we are when these pills don’t work.

I’ve written before on the over-medicalization of psychiatric disorders and the pharmaceutical industry’s role in this controversy, but this time the topic got me thinking about possible alternative treatments for depression, other than cognitive-behavioral therapy or mood-altering medications.

Hearing, touching and tasting in color

I don't know about you, but to me Wednesday is sun-shiney yellow. Tuesday is hunter green, Thursday purple-ish blue and Friday a deep red. Monday is white, a blank slate and a chance for a new week, whereas Saturday is sparkly black. Sunday is gray, the depressing slouch towards the beginning of the work-week, but also a convenient mix of Saturday and Monday.

This color-word association is not a figment of my imagination or an indication that I'm going crazy, but is instead a recognized neuropsychological phenomenon called synesthesia. Synesthesia can be thought of as a crossing of the senses, where one perceptual experience simultaneously expresses another. It is estimated to occur in some form in roughly 20% of the population, with color-grapheme being the most common (1). Here, letters or numbers are experienced as taking on unique and varying shades of color. Apparently the experience that I have is also quite common, wherein units of time - such as days of the week - are also expressed in color. There are up to 60 different forms of synesthesia, including sound-color, grapheme-shape and, my personal favorite, word-taste. In this last one, words or names are experienced as different flavors in the individual's mouth. Reported palates range from buttered toast to berries and everything in between. Think of it as chewing a different flavored jellybean for every person that you know.