Beating the poppy seed defense

During my PhD, one of the research projects I was involved in was a relapse prevention study testing individuals who had previously been addicted to alcohol, cocaine or heroin, but were no longer using any drugs.

One participant who took part in the study — I’ll call him Dave — was a young guy who was dependent on alcohol, but swore up and down he had never abused any drugs. Dave was three weeks into the study and doing well, staying abstinent and remaining cheerful and cooperative throughout the sessions. However, one morning when Dave came in and went through his usual drug screen, he tested positive for heroin, something he claimed (and I believed) he had never taken.

Do you have an addictive personality?

You’ll have to bear with me if this is a bit of a self-indulgent post, but I have some exciting news, Brain Study-ers: I’ve officially submitted my dissertation for a PhD in psychology!

In light of this – the culmination of three years of blood, sweat, tears and an exorbitant amount of caffeine – I thought I’d write this week on part of my thesis work (I promise to do my best to keep the jargon out of it!)

One of the biggest questions in addiction research is why do some people become dependent on drugs, while others are able to use in moderation? Certainly some of the risk lies in the addictive potential of the substances themselves, but still the vast majority of individuals who have used drugs never become dependent on them. This then leads to the question, is there really such a thing as an “addictive personality”, and what puts someone at a greater risk for addiction if they do choose to try drugs?

New blog on the block

So I have a confession to make: I’ve been cheating on this blog. I’ve taken up with a new writing endeavor, a hot inter-disciplinary thing, and today is the day we go public with our (current) affairs.

A group of highly talented graduate students at King’s College in Cambridge have launched a new web magazine today, and I’m honored to be a part of it. The first issue tackles everything from US national security and the CIA to the uprising of artists in Germany over state funding cuts. I’ve even contributed my own article, which dedicated Brain Study followers might recognize as the mutant off-spring of a piece I posted last year on ‘pathologizing the norm‘. It’s been beefed up and fleshed out as I attempt to tackle some of the proposed changes in the upcoming DSM-V, slated to be published later this year.

More sexism in science

Following on my post the other week on Gender bias on both sides of scientific research, I want to draw attention to an incident that occurred at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting last week in New Orleans. SFN is by far the largest neuroscience event every year, drawing over 30,000 attendees to come and revel in nerdy neuro madness for a week (think of it as a music festival for science geeks). With so many talks, poster sessions and symposiums, not to mention the sheer number of people, the conference can be overwhelming. But it is also overwhelmingly positive and exciting, allowing you the opportunity to check out new research, get new ideas, forge new relationships and collaborations, and, if you're lucky, even meet your academic super-star crush (I'm looking at you David Eagleman). 

However, one conference-goer decided that the quality of the researchers wasn't quite up to his standards. Dr. Dario Maestripieri of the University of Chicago complained on Facebook that the cosmetic caliber of the female attendees was lacking this year, stating "there are...an unusually high concentration of unattractive women [at the conference]. The super model types are completely absent." The comment, originally discovered and posted by Drug Monkey on his blog, went on to ask, "Are unattractive women particularly attracted to neuroscience? Are beautiful women particularly uninterested in the brain?", and considerately topped it off with, "No offense to anyone..."

SFN '12: Vulnerabilities for drug addiction

For anybody who's in New Orleans for SFN this week, come by room 273 at 1pm today to learn about vulnerabilities for drug addiction. It's an excellent nanosymposium set up by the fantastic Dr. Jenn Murray covering both human and preclincial studies into risk factors for addiction. The talks will include investigations into the classic predictive traits of impulsivity, anxiety and novelty-seeking, and they'll also delve into environmental risk factors for addiction, such as maternal care and environmental stimulation. 

I'll be presenting first (so be there at 1pm sharp!) on my work on endophenotypes for addiction. This involves studying both dependent drug users and their non-dependent biological siblings, who share 50% of their genes and the same environment growing up, but who never developed any sort of drug or alcohol abuse. I'll be looking specifically at cognitive control deficits and frontal cortex abnormalities in both of these groups compared to unrelated healthy control volunteers. There are some surprises in the results, so if you're at SFN come by at 1pm to find out what they are!

Gender bias on both sides of scientific research

A disturbing new study from researchers at Yale University was released this week in PNAS, reporting that gender bias is still pervasive in science and the workplace. An identical application for a laboratory manager position was given to 127 senior faculty members at a number of research universities, the only difference being that half of the applications contained a male name, while in the other half the applicant's name was female. Across the board supervisors (male and female alike) ranked the 'male' application as more competent, more hireable, and stated that they would be more willing to supervise this candidate. Even more striking was the pay gap that existed between the recommended wages for the male and female applicants, a difference of roughly $3,700 starting salary. This is representative of the reported 23% average earnings difference between men and women in the workplace.