SFN 2012

More sexism in science

Following on my post the other week on Gender bias on both sides of scientific research, I want to draw attention to an incident that occurred at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting last week in New Orleans. SFN is by far the largest neuroscience event every year, drawing over 30,000 attendees to come and revel in nerdy neuro madness for a week (think of it as a music festival for science geeks). With so many talks, poster sessions and symposiums, not to mention the sheer number of people, the conference can be overwhelming. But it is also overwhelmingly positive and exciting, allowing you the opportunity to check out new research, get new ideas, forge new relationships and collaborations, and, if you're lucky, even meet your academic super-star crush (I'm looking at you David Eagleman). 

However, one conference-goer decided that the quality of the researchers wasn't quite up to his standards. Dr. Dario Maestripieri of the University of Chicago complained on Facebook that the cosmetic caliber of the female attendees was lacking this year, stating "there are...an unusually high concentration of unattractive women [at the conference]. The super model types are completely absent." The comment, originally discovered and posted by Drug Monkey on his blog, went on to ask, "Are unattractive women particularly attracted to neuroscience? Are beautiful women particularly uninterested in the brain?", and considerately topped it off with, "No offense to anyone..."

SFN '12: Vulnerabilities for drug addiction

For anybody who's in New Orleans for SFN this week, come by room 273 at 1pm today to learn about vulnerabilities for drug addiction. It's an excellent nanosymposium set up by the fantastic Dr. Jenn Murray covering both human and preclincial studies into risk factors for addiction. The talks will include investigations into the classic predictive traits of impulsivity, anxiety and novelty-seeking, and they'll also delve into environmental risk factors for addiction, such as maternal care and environmental stimulation. 

I'll be presenting first (so be there at 1pm sharp!) on my work on endophenotypes for addiction. This involves studying both dependent drug users and their non-dependent biological siblings, who share 50% of their genes and the same environment growing up, but who never developed any sort of drug or alcohol abuse. I'll be looking specifically at cognitive control deficits and frontal cortex abnormalities in both of these groups compared to unrelated healthy control volunteers. There are some surprises in the results, so if you're at SFN come by at 1pm to find out what they are!