Sexism

We have something important to say

In case you're not up on the latest Science Blogging/Writing/Communication gossip (which I'm assuming most of you aren't), well, shit has really hit the fan recently.

There have been a slew of misogynistic occurrences in the past week, with more stories of sexual harassment coming to the surface. Numerous scientists and bloggers have commented on the developing situation far more effectively than I will be able to here, and I'll be sure to link to them as I go. But first, the unfolding story.

More sexism in science

Following on my post the other week on Gender bias on both sides of scientific research, I want to draw attention to an incident that occurred at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting last week in New Orleans. SFN is by far the largest neuroscience event every year, drawing over 30,000 attendees to come and revel in nerdy neuro madness for a week (think of it as a music festival for science geeks). With so many talks, poster sessions and symposiums, not to mention the sheer number of people, the conference can be overwhelming. But it is also overwhelmingly positive and exciting, allowing you the opportunity to check out new research, get new ideas, forge new relationships and collaborations, and, if you're lucky, even meet your academic super-star crush (I'm looking at you David Eagleman). 

However, one conference-goer decided that the quality of the researchers wasn't quite up to his standards. Dr. Dario Maestripieri of the University of Chicago complained on Facebook that the cosmetic caliber of the female attendees was lacking this year, stating "there are...an unusually high concentration of unattractive women [at the conference]. The super model types are completely absent." The comment, originally discovered and posted by Drug Monkey on his blog, went on to ask, "Are unattractive women particularly attracted to neuroscience? Are beautiful women particularly uninterested in the brain?", and considerately topped it off with, "No offense to anyone..."

Gender bias on both sides of scientific research

A disturbing new study from researchers at Yale University was released this week in PNAS, reporting that gender bias is still pervasive in science and the workplace. An identical application for a laboratory manager position was given to 127 senior faculty members at a number of research universities, the only difference being that half of the applications contained a male name, while in the other half the applicant's name was female. Across the board supervisors (male and female alike) ranked the 'male' application as more competent, more hireable, and stated that they would be more willing to supervise this candidate. Even more striking was the pay gap that existed between the recommended wages for the male and female applicants, a difference of roughly $3,700 starting salary. This is representative of the reported 23% average earnings difference between men and women in the workplace.